What defund the police means

I’ve not been great at writing much about anything lately, except to write to elected officials. So here’s what I wrote to the city council this morning about this issue. Our over-policing harms everyone but because of the way society operates and the reality of racism, overpolicing harms black people and anyone perceived as too different more.


Good morning councilpersons (and staff)!

I can’t call this morning and at this point I assume you’re just tallying!

Anyway defund the police sounds scary but what it really means is to take out of the hands of the police (and justice system and jails & prison) problems that don’t make sense for armed people to work on.

As an example, in January 2019, 6+ cop cars showed up to the Living Computer Museum. I work near by and saw the swarm of cops and wondered what could possibly be so dangerous there.

It turns out it was … a sleeping man who had broken in to find warmth. He was no danger and his “crime” was incredibly minor. We permit corporations and businesses to get away with far worse every single day. Nonetheless he was booked into jail and presumably charged with a crime. I doubt it helped him improve his life — and it could have gone a lot worse than it did. What if he had, when sleepy, moved in a way that any of the cops present had felt was threatening? He could be dead.

Cops are not social workers and are not the best choice for the vast majority of problems we use them as the primary presence of authority and social “leadership”, from homelessness, mental health crises, to drug abuse, to traffic enforcement and even gang activity.

So I stand with the demands of the protesters that we at least start with:

– Removing 50% of SPD’s budget. I believe an examination of what person hours are used on are overwhelmingly devoted to social problems that do not required armed agents of the state to address effectively.
– Redirect that money to community solutions like housing, health care access, trauma services and so on.
– Finally, the folks protesting must not be punished for their protesting.

Thank you,
Rachael Ludwick
Beacon Hill


Thanks for reading and write or call your city council (if in the United States) to ask them to reduce the scope of police work and bring more accountability. If you need a fairly quick read The End of Policing by Alex Vitale is a thorough but fairly short book. It’s a free ebook right now. You can get a quick taste in this NPR interview or this podcast episode.

Just say “HELL NO!” to paleo swamp gas

A few weeks ago I attempted chiles rellenos for the first time. If you’ve never had them, they are roasted and skinned peppers (often poblanos) that are de-seeded, then stuffed with something, often cheese in the United States, then battered and fried, and served with a savory-spicy tomato broth/sauce. Mine didn’t come out that pretty but it was an experience and they were delicious! I used the recipe from a Diana Kennedy book.

One thing that had always held me back was how to roast peppers. It’s not something I bother to do often and most books recommend an open flame which we don’t really have at home since we have an electric stove – and most of my adult life I’ve only had electric stoves. We got a decent crop of poblanos this year in the garden so I had to try them as they are a family favorite. So I looked up alternate ways and a broiler works really well: you put them on a sheet pan (no oil!) under the broiler until blistered, then turn over and let the other side blister. Note that part about a sheet pan – you can do a fairly large number all at once! See my lovely peppers:

A bowl of roasted and skinned poblanos and small sweet red and yellow peppers
A bowl . roasted and skinned poblanos along with some small yellow and red sweet peppers (also roasted and skinned)

What does this have to do with “paleo swamp gas”? Seattle City Council-member Mike O’Brien has proposed to ban natural gas installation in new housing and commercial development (see summary from SCC Insight). “But what about my charred peppers [eggplants, etc]?” was one of the immediate refrains.

Continue reading “Just say “HELL NO!” to paleo swamp gas”

Seattle’s Oil Pipelines

A few months ago,  everyone in government and politics came to cut the ribbon on the new oil pipeline. Even the governor running for president came. But he didn’t mention carbon pollution or climate change. No one did in the endless speeches faithfully relayed to twitter where I tried not to read but could not turn away. We even had tours of the new facility!

Why were they so overjoyed about a late, over-budget, expensive oil pipeline?!?!

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What’s in HB 1453 to better protect tenants?

I get a lot of political advocacy email. I got one asking me to comment in favor of Washington House bill 1453 to better protect tenants. It’s primary sponsor is Nicole Macri who by all accounts is awesome and the advocacy group’s summary sounded like a great thing for us to change, so I commented and expressed the sentiment that tenants should be as secure in housing as home owners are. Anyway, I couldn’t find any articles quickly when I did comment, so here I am reading the full text the next day. 🙂

Continue reading “What’s in HB 1453 to better protect tenants?”